I Am Not A Hypocrite! (TFIOS Pre-Review)

Phew! I am beat. My counts are pretty high right now so my doctors have been increasing my chemo doses the last few weeks and I’m really starting to feel it. Either that or I’m feeling tired because I haven’t been able to exercise because of my hip issues/surgery incision. Fortunately, I got my MRI today and will hopefully know tomorrow what the deal is with the bum hip! Praying that it will not effect my running. I’m also feeling a little weird because I’m hoping my counts have dropped enough that they will lower my chemo again. Who wants their counts to be low? Just me.. okay. bye.

So I’ve decided to start reading The Fault In Our Stars by John Greene. In case you haven’t heard, seems like a fictional novel about a cancer patient/teen romance type deal. I’ve been skeptical about reading it because I know that it’s about a cancer patient. I don’t really know anything else about it except that it is being made into a movie. Both of these things make me feel a little bit uncomfortable about it. I first heard about the book while I was deep in chemo and knew that I didn’t want to read it then. I was too emotionally fragile to read about anyone else’s cancer, especially if it was fictional, while I was dealing with the real thing.

The truth of it is that nothing you see on television or hear from other people is going to define your experience with cancer. It is absolutely unique in every aspect for each and every person effected. That’s the truth, and that’s what matters. With that said, it’s hard to keep that in mind when you’re actually going through it. I was constantly comparing myself to other people who had cancer. This person lived, this person died, this person was horribly nauseous, this person had a horrible reaction to that chemo, blah blah blah. Eventually, I would remind myself that these people are not me, they don’t have my cancer, they don’t have my markers, they don’t have my doctors, they don’t have the same body, they are different. We all are. That said, they only way I was really able to solve that problem for myself (during chemo) was to avoid at all costs any stories of other people with cancer. Thus ruling out reading/watching/participating in TFIOS.

When I found out that they were making a movie about it, I became even more suspicious. As most people who have experienced cancer/chemo/radiation know, Hollywood loves to dramatize the experience. That’s great for Hollywood, but not great for people who get diagnosed with cancer and know nothing but what they see on TV, which seems miserable and awful  (i.e. me). Literally, the first thing my nurses said to me at the hospital when I was expressing my concerns was that I should throw anything I’ve seen on TV out the window. This worries me. I cannot support anything that will get so much publicity and touch so many people if it is a misrepresentation. There are already so many misconceptions about cancer/chemo, the world doesn’t need anymore false information. I don’t want anyone else to be as unprepared as I was for a cancer diagnosis.

With all of that said, I’ve been thinking about it a lot and both of those reasons for not reading the book are flawed. First of all, I can’t literally judge a book by its cover. I honestly don’t know anything about the story. All of what I just said is complete speculation on my part and I’m not down for that. Also, I just argued that everyone’s cancer experience is different, therefore, who am I to judge whether or not the characters/plot of this book are accurate or not? How will I ever know if John Green is dealing out “misinterpretations of cancer” if I don’t read the book? Therefore, I must read the book. At least then I will know the truth of it, either way.

Please comment if you’d like to share your perspective, but don’t spoil anything!

Stay tuned for my new review after I read The Fault In Our Stars! Hopefully will have it done by the time I get back from Ireland.

Thanks for reading!

xoxo Kathy

4 thoughts on “I Am Not A Hypocrite! (TFIOS Pre-Review)

  1. As a chronic Leukemia fighter, in my opinion, John Greene NAILED it! Read it in one day. It is an absolutely beautifully written book about LIFE & relationships with cancer. Enjoy!
    ~Lauren Blanchard

  2. As someone who’s boyfriend is battling stage IV melanoma, I too have a hard time with books/movies about cancer. When I think of “A Walk to Remember” now, it almost angers me. This beautiful romance they had and blah blah blah. It’s not like that. At all. It’s hard. There’s mood swings. There’s anxiety. There’s vomit. There’s depression. There’s days spent in bed. There’s weakness. There’s so many unknowns. So many questions. Feeling helpless. Feeling angry. Feeling sad. Feeling scared. There are no movies or books that show the reality of what cancer is. However, like you said, who am I to judge? Because everyone’s experience is truly different. At this point for me I know reading that book or watching that movie is not something I should do.

    • Thank you for your insight Melissa! I totally hear you, and I’m glad there are others out there who understand! I wish you and your boyfriend all the best.

      Kathy

  3. My daughter has A.L.L. even though I do not have cancer I am emotionally in pain watching this nightmare. I can not even look at the cover of this book. Maybe one day I will. Sometimes I almost want to tear up when I see children with their families. I always wonder what the road holds for them. If their hearts will be broken too. I quickly stopped comparing my child with others too BC I have learned everyone’s treatment is different. I liked the fragile comment BC that is definitely how I feel at times

Leave a Reply