5things

Now, I’m not going to profess that I know everything there is to know about cancer, or anywhere close to that, but having been a cancer patient I think I have a pretty good idea of what we, or at least I, think people should know about cancer. Especially since I knew little to nothing about the disease or its fighters before I was slapped in the face with a diagnosis myself. Realizing and admitting that you are ignorant is not easy, it’s sort of like swallowing vinegar or 250 mg of prednisone, but once its done you have the opportunity to open your eyes and your mind to reality. You have the ability to learn, understand and analyze the things that really matter in this life, to see what goes on in the world and play a part in making it a better place. More than that, you can inform and help others in doing the same thing.

Of course, I don’t meant to call anyone ignorant, but I know that I was ignorant to many things when I was diagnosed with Leukemia at age 20 and since that diagnosis I have begun to pay more attention to everything going on in the world, starting with cancer. Everything that I knew about cancer was surface level, and honestly, that might be saying too much. Most of my detailed knowledge was from television, which basically means that I knew nothing besides the generic details that I’m sure everyone knows. Cancer of a particular area, spreads or doesn’t spread, different stages, chemo/radiation, works or doesn’t work. This left me totally unprepared for a cancer diagnosis, which is exactly what I got. I believe that if I knew what I know now then, I would have had a smoother transition than I did. And my hope is that by creating this list of things that I wish I knew, I can help others to cope with their diagnosis.

1thing

The Hollywood version of cancer is often an over-dramatization of what the cancer experience is really like. Sometimes the information and images shown on television and in movies is not accurate or out of date. For example, I was diagnosed with Leukemia, a term I remember hearing for the first time when I caught my Dad (I know, right?) watching A Walk To Remembereveryone’s favorite cancer movie about a teenage girl with Leukemia who falls in love. Well, that movie was made in 2002 and I was diagnosed in 2013, so when my mind immediately jumped to that movie after hearing the words “Leukemia,” I was panicking for nothing. Ten years later, cancer treatment is leaps and bounds from where it was back then. Of course, I didn’t know that then, but you do now, which brings me to my second point.

2thingScientifically, medically, you bet, things are getting good! No, there is not a cure for cancer, not yet anyway, but things are improving and will continue to until there is a cure for everyone. However, treatments are improving, people are surviving, things are getting organized and stuff is getting done. I think a lot of people don’t realize the progress scientists and doctors have been making in the past decade. Sometimes, when a problem isn’t right in our faces we don’t pay attention to it until a breakthrough happens, t least, that’s how I thought about things, “There hasn’t been a newscast for the cure of cancer so things must still be pretty bleak over in cancer-land.” This just isn’t the case. Chemotherapy and radiation are still what is used to treat cancer, but treatments are catered to the individual, to each case, to the specific cancer. We learn more and more about the disease, the drugs, the treatments everyday, whether its broadcasted or not!

3thingSo this is really cool. Sometimes I think maybe I’m the only person who didn’t know about this stuff before I was diagnosed but I figure, if I didn’t know there’s bound to be others! Everyone knows that chemo and radiation make you uncomfortable, they make you nauseous and give you pain, along with a myriad of other symptoms. It is only reasonable to assume that there are resources to counteract these symptoms. And there are! My personal favorite is nausea medicine. I have lived in gripping fear of nausea and vomiting for my entire life so my biggest concern with going through chemo was that I would have to deal with it every day for 8 months. Finding out about Zofran (my personal favorite) and several other nausea treatment options literally saved my life. I am proud to say that in eight months of intense chemotherapy I threw up a total of one time, that’s right one. So don’t be afraid of chemo, like I was, because there are plenty of resources to help you deal with the side effects!

4thing

This is something that I cannot stress the importance of enough. If I have cemented one thing into my mind from going through this whole ordeal it is that everyone is unique in our thoughts, paths, personality, and physicality. How does that relate to cancer? When I was sick I found myself comparing my illness and my experience to others around me. I knew that this was unhealthy and tried to avoid hearing about other cancer patients as much as possible. It is extremely difficult to keep your spirits up when you hear about someone with the same cancer as you dying. In these times, I soothed myself by reminding myself of the facts. We are all different. Everyone in the world, everyone with cancer, everyone with leukemia. All of my experiences are my own, my cancer is unique to me, my treatment roadmap, my doses, my schedule, my body is my own and it unlike anyone else’s. Sure we might overlap in some areas, we might have had the same drugs, but we had different side effects. So take comfort in the fact that you’re different, you’re you, and no matter what anyone else says about their friend who had this or their doctor who said that, your on your own individual journey.

5thing

When I was diagnosed I had a hard time dealing with the fact that I didn’t have a choice. I had to drop everything and become a full time cancer patient. I had to spend a good part of the week at the hospital willingly injecting myself with poison so that I might have a chance at living. It took me a while to be able to focus on the fact that there are some things in this life that we just cannot control. My own personal tsunami. But once I accepted this fact, I was able to move forward. Acceptance is the first step to recovery. The first step towards focusing on what really matters and what you actually are capable of influencing. Like if you want to be treated, where you want to be treated, how you are going to handle this crisis, what you are going to do after its over. When I realized that not being able to make one decision, gave me the opportunity to make so many more, like the decision to write this blog right now, it made everything hurt a little less. It enabled me to take back my power from the universe, to stop being the victim and to start being the fighter.

Knowledge is so powerful, and though knowing these things won’t stop the hurt, the sadness, the anger, the fear, I hope that it will lessen the blow for someone out there.

xoxo Kathy

I miss being sick???

It sounds crazy, right?

How could someone miss being poked, prodded, injected, cut open, bed-ridden and drugged up 24/7? I didn’t know the answer to that question either until I started to feel that way and it FUH-REAKED me out. I mean, I lived it, I hated it, it was extremely difficult, but I did it. And then it was over. Right? I mean, RIGHT?!

Wrong.

It’s not over. Even now that I’ve completed the circle, I’ve moved back to LA, I’m restarting my independent, adult life, it’s still not over. And that’s the kicker.

When changes happen in our lives it is only natural to have repercussive emotional responses. Knowing this, I was prepared to feel unsettled, uncomfortable, maybe a little bit depressed and out of place after my move. Even though I know that this is what I want and what I needed to do, I knew that I wouldn’t be able to help having those negative feelings and doubts. I was also expecting to feel emotional about “completing the circle,” ending my cancer experience and accomplishing my goal. However, I was not anticipating all of those emotions correlating. I was not expecting to feel uncomfortable and unsettled because I completed the circle. Neither was I expecting to think things like, “Everything was so much more simple when I was sick,” or “Life was great when I could just lie in bed and watch Netflix all day and it was OK.” I was there, it was not simple and it was not great. But still, now, when I think about it, it seems natural, it seems normal.

When I was diagnosed, I had to make a new normal for myself. I wasn’t aware of myself doing it, adjusting to it, I just did. Everything changed and even though it felt uncomfortable a lot of the time, and it wasn’t where I wanted to be or what I wanted to be doing, it became normal. My comfort zone turned into a hospital waiting room, exam room, chemo room, etc. It relaxed me to watch for blood return from my port as the nurses loaded me up with chemo. Or to watch the blood drip from the bags into the tubing reservoirs, then down the tubes into my body. The medical jargon, the blood counts, the systems of the hospital became familiar. They became my normal without me even really noticing.

So you see, I was surprised. Not that my move made me miss my home, my family, or my home-life. I was expecting to miss those things. But that it made me miss my patient life, my cancer life, my normal.

I think it makes sense when you think about it that way, to miss being sick. It’s natural to feel emotional when you go through a big change, just like it’s natural to adapt to those changes whether you are aware of it or not. Over time, we adjust and we heal, it is just human nature.

Just some thoughts..

xoxo Kathy