LeukoencephalopathyHere is the continuation of my story, to read the first installment, please click here.

The next morning, I woke up feeling.. okay. The doctors came in to do their rounds and explained that what had happened to me was a form of leukoencephalopathy caused by the methotrexate in my spinal fluid. I’ll be honest, I don’t really ask a lot of questions when it comes to medical deep medical mumbo-jumbo. I need to know a general idea of what, a reason why (if there is one) and what I need to do to make it go away. So the gist I got from the docs was that this leuko-business occurred due to an allergic reaction of sorts to the chemo. I usually sum it up as an inflammation of the fluid layer surrounding my brain. I honestly don’t know if that’s actually what it was but.. that’s how I always describe it.

The “antedote” for this reaction is.. cough syrup… no seriously. They stuck a tube down my nose and into my stomach to force feed me cough syrup.

As the day dragged on I began to feel worse and worse, nothing compared to the day before but I definitely wasn’t my usual chemo-ridden self. I became extremely nauseous, at least that was what I thought it was, and asked for a dose of zofran before I headed home. That’s right, home. Earlier in the day the doctors told us that my counts looked good and I could be discharged, a rare opportunity that my mother and I jumped at (it was my shortest hospital stay to date). This also meant that I could have the NG tube removed from my throat, but only if I could show everyone that I was able to drink and swallow on my own. Try swallowing with a tube stuck down your throat without gagging, yuck. I did what I had to do to get the hell out of there and choked down some water. A nurse came in and swiftly plucked the tube out.. a sensation that I was TOTALLY unprepared for and wished to never feel again thanks to the lovely amount of bile that came up with it.

Here’s something to keep in mind as you continue to read, the day that I experienced my first little bout of leukoencephalopathy via intrathecal methotrexate, was the day that I received yet another infusion of, ding ding ding! Intrathecal methotrexate! There was no way for us to know it, but leaving the hospital that day was a HUGE mistake. We were sent home by the hospital and told by the doctors that everything seemed fine and if something were to happen we should call. Looking back on it, I’m grateful that I got to suffer through the next few days at home instead of in, as I like to call it, Monkey Jail. I’m sure that anyone who has spent time in the hospital can understand that.

I arrived home feeling like crap and figured I just needed to rest and sleep off what remained of the reaction, besides, I pretty much always felt some sort of under-the-weather. I choked down my cough syrup gel caps, little red pills I took to calling, “dragon eggs,” and went to sleep. The next morning I didn’t feel much better, I might even have been a little worse. And we found out that I definitely was worse when we got a call from the hospital. The doctor who sent us home misread my blood counts and I needed to go back to clinic to get a blood transfusion, immediately. (This is funny because anyone who looked at my labs would have had to read them wrong in order for me to be discharged and sent home. It’s even funnier because my mom always requests a copy of my lab sheets to keep for her records and for some reason on this day she didn’t get one.)

Mom and I headed back up there, an hour each way, to get the blood. Needless to say we were cranky about the whole situation. I tried to tell the Nurse Practitioner who saw me while I was getting my transfusion that I felt more ill than normal but she thought it was just because of the blood and since I didn’t have a fever, sent me back home. Generally, a blood transfusion can solve so many of a cancer patients immediate problems. If you’re dizzy, winded, tired, you’re heart beats fast or you’re pale, blood can give you a nice boost of color and energy, it almost makes you feel like a normal person again. For these reasons, it was logical to assume that getting blood would make me feel better and I would be fine to go home. I wasn’t fine. I remember getting in to the car after leaving clinic and feeling so crappy that I told mom not to start the car yet. I waited until I felt a little bit better and then allowed her to start driving us home.

The next few days were.. miserable. The blood did not help at all. It is hard for me to remember a lot of what happened, I think that’s because I was mostly sleeping and resting, but there are a few things that I can share. I couldn’t stand to have the television on, the only thing I would allow was my mother to read to me before I went to sleep. I never left my bed and in my bed I hardly moved. I barely ate anything. One morning I woke up early and felt okay, so I started a movie on Hulu and actually requested food. A few bites in I began to feel yucky again. I shoved away the plate and turned off the movie. Later, mom tried to get me to go on a walk around the block. I refused and she pushed, thinking it would do me some good. I finally gave in but only got to the mailbox, a few feet from our house, before I felt so exhausted that I had to turn back. That was shocking to me. I’d had my fair share of days on end spent in bed and not eating, but I’d always been at least able to make it to the end of our street, even if I couldn’t go all the way around the block.

The worst thing, the hardest thing for me to relive, was when I was coerced into bathing. I couldn’t be up long enough to shower so my mom drew me a bath. She had to sit by the tub with me and help me get in and out. I wouldn’t say that it was embarrassing, but I would never have thought that as a twenty year old woman, my mother would have to give me a bath. It made me sad, for myself, the fact that this was what I had been reduced to in a few short weeks, after being so independent my whole life. It makes me sad now, to remember the times when I made my mom stay in the hall while I left the bathroom door open just in case I needed her help, because I couldn’t trust myself to take care of me. Cancer has a way of chiseling away at your independence, at your right to your own body, your own life. This is the mental tug-of-war with cancer, a mind game that I am still playing even today.

~to be continued~

Keep checking back for Part 3, that’s where things start to get really, well, shitty.

Thanks for the love everyone

xoxo Kathy